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can be summed up in two words, government unions. unions use their power to press government to put their interests first. in contract negotiations unions always insist on seniority-based layouts and this gives guaranteed job security to senior members. but it also means the school districts are forced to lay off the new hires first even if those teachers are star performers. parents object but the unions have decided they can accept that. the unions also want understandably bear generation retirement benefits for their members. in michigan 27% of school districts budgets provide pensions and health benefits and it's not hard to see what. is a state can retire after 25 years on the job and collect full benefits i have a lot of teachers retire in their late 40s or early 50's. but if you care about getting dollar spent on the classroom that is a bit of a problem in the state facing a tremendous budget crunch like michigan is but when the legislature propose raising the minimum retirement age not to 65 social security h.b. 260 the michigan education association used their political clo
is the cover of a new book coming out august 2012, "seven principles of good government: liberty, people and politics." it's written by former new mexico governor, gary johnson. and he is also the libertarian party nominee for president in 2012. governor john said, when and why did you leave the republican party and become a libertarian? >> you know, i've probably been a libertarian my entire life. this is just kind of coming out of the closet. i don't think i am unlike most americans. i think there's a lot more americans in this country that declare themselves libertarians as opposed to voting libertarian. so the picture and trying to make right now is vote libertarian with me this one time. give me a shot at changing things. and if it does somewhere, you can always return to tyranny and i'm going to argue that so so we have right now. >> what are the seven principles of good government you read about? >> one as being reality-based. just find out what his wife, base your decision inactions i'm not. make sure everybody that knows -- that should know what you're doing, knows what you're d
free markets are moral and big government isn't." we are at freedom-fest in las vegas. mr. steve forbes, why is it that free markets are more government enabled. what is an example of that. >> guest: obviously, functions of government have been big government. but the terms of big government not being moral is the opposite of what it does. it ends up creating the environment where we have less ability to get ahead, it creates dependency, it plays crony capitalism, which hurts career entrepreneurship and opportunity. all the government and what it says it does, helps the poor, make sure that markets on the right direction, they actually do the opposite. they are short-term oriented to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way a business should. they have their own agenda in terms of those special interest groups and the like. the bigger they get from them were hardly due to the economy and the less chance that they have to improve your lot in life, as abraham lincoln put it. >> host: is reality a part of capitalism to smack it is the bas
for the government, which also administrates prices, and called taxes, and so lower tax rates expand the economy and lead to more revenues for the government. and last zerosome struggle over government favors. >> we have been talking here on booktv with george author of several books including a new edition of "wealth and poverty" which came out originally in the early '0eus. this is booktv on c-span2. coming up next edward griffin. the an libertarian conference held in las vegas. he talks about the book the creature from jekyll island. the creation of the federal reserve system. it's over fifteen minutes. the book on your screen written in 1994. it is currently in the 32nd print. this sphift edition. and the author is g. edward griffin. these joining us on c-span2 in las vegas. who is the creature from jekyll island? >> what is the creature. >> yes. i had fun with the tight. i thought if anybody saw it this the bookstore, they might think it was a equal to jurassic park. it is they are the federal reserve m and the reason for the jekyll island connection was because one of the most springing th
information coming from the government because it does work both ways. >> well, looking at that, and you said a blanket approach to regulation wouldn't work here do you think there's room for each agency, talk about the energy department, faa, to expand the regulations? or maybe what you're talking about offer more incentives, insurance has been discussed, federal, earning more federal contracts if you keep your systems up to a certain level security. >> indemnity on pc would be of benefit to industry, to be able to have that capability if they comply with a risk-based standards. and that's really what we're talking about. when we look at breaching of data, for instance, in our team, and verizon can we as a process called evidence-based risk management. so it's not what we think is out the. it's what we actually identify and then what we can correct. so if we take that type of approach between government and industry and not try to gold plate everything and have the perfect network, but have a risk-based management approach that says i can assume risk at this certain level based
. automatic these are not seeking special government favor the. the big bank the goldman of the sack of the world were intimate with government. and of the government i.t. was mandating the purchase of these credit default swaps and other device which is ended upbringing down the economy. >> is the . >> it's not pro-- to support goldman sacks. and the embrace with the department of the treasury. >> is the supply side economics dead? >> sup pry economics is true economics. and and actually excited to mitt romney running for president because bain company was one of the providers of the foundation of supply side economics. there are -- they applied it to business that. they showed how the most effectivive way for businesses to gain share market share was to cut the prices. and you could cut prices at your business gaining market share because cost drop by about 20 to 30% with each doubling of total units that sold. the cost general economies 77 scale and learning. called the learning curve and this is really the foundation of supply side economics. why when you cut taxes, which are jus
the governments behind russia and china are very good at that stuff. and that will come into any confrontation we have with them. content, they are more skilled at using than we are but we should certainly use whatever weapons we can. >> thank you, john. let's give john wohlstetter i hand. [applause] .. whenever it is you are watching i appreciate that. always told by my wife and daughter after presenting some earlier remarks, i should make it much shorter which i will try to do. my hope is to talk for about 15, no longer than 20 minutes and reserve a lot of time for the questions and commentss and counterarguments that not only do eyes the suspect some of you have but i know given some people in this room i know without a shadow of a doubt i welcome. this is, we are told, the most important election in our lifetime and it may be that more people believe that this year than believe in 2008-2004-2004 another election where that is regularly said. for this to be true, among other things elections must have genuine consequences for the making of public policy particularly with regard to domestic pol
and in the balkans not happened, and if instead of the occupation of palestine and imposition of a faith government displacement and genocide of millions of people around the world, the truth behind these wars have been revealed based on justice. had saddam saddam hussein not invaded iran and had -- supported the rights of the iranian people instead of siding with saddam, the tragic incident of september 11 and the military actions against afghanistan and iraq that left millions killed in homeless had not happened, and if instead of killing the culprit into the seed without informing the world and the people of america and an independent fact-finding team had been formed to make the general public aware of the incident and therefore bringing to justice the perpetrators, had extremism or terrorism not unused to secure political goals, had the arms been turned into pens and military expenditures been used to promote amity among nations, had ethnic religious or -- not been beaten and that differences have not been used for the purposes of advancing political agendas, have the right to criticize the he
numbers on leaky boats and some sadly have been drowning at sea trying to get here. the government has been under a lot of pressure from the opposition to take a tougher policy to deter votes from making history. finally, the government act down and embraced the opposition's policy. after it was recommended by an expert panel. i asylum-seekers will now be sent to the tiny pacific country of not move and an island. have the claims process. rather than on shore here in austria. it's what the opposition wanted your but opposition leader didn't let the government get away without reminding them of the political backflip they have just done. >> are there any questions speak with my question is to the prime minister. and i thank the prime minister for finally a docking one element in the coalition's border protection policy. namely offshore processing. and i ask when will she a doubt the other two elements in our policy, namely turning boats around where it is safe to do so and protection bases that are also necessary if we are finally to stop the votes? >> the prime minister as the call. >>
's possible, that time is not unlimited. i thought it was a warning to the iranian government is a difficult deal with. i thought it was a important speech that the president gave yesterday in my. >> >> host: how about mitt romney can, you assess from what yoaf heard and have seen over the months. is there anything close to what you might call a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encaps late it? >> guest: he it a smart and successful person. he's been talking about foreign policy. it's not the issue he wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for republican to be in to be running against democrat who has a strong record on national security. i think that's been difficult for the romney campaign, you know, i have worked for both republicans and democrats in various administrations, so i'm not a political person. but if seems to me that republicans always try to run to the right of a democrat and sometimes accuse democrats of being weak on national security. on this ele
government calls for dialogue at the beginning of the events in my country, but this call did not find any positive response from most opposition parties. moreover, my government responded positively throughout the crisis to each and every sincere initiative that aims to find a peaceful solution, a solution that is based on national dialogue among syrians, that rejects external manipulation, and that stops the shedding of syrian blood and preserving syria and its future. based on this principle position, and despite the syrian leadership's conviction that there are no sincere intentions among some regional and international parties that push for the escalation of the syrian crisis, which fuel its fire and heat it by forcing all attempts for dialogue, and insisting on creating a state of instability to ensure the need for foreign interference. despite all this, syria cooperated with the arab observers mission, and the subsequent international initiatives linked to the work of the united nations special envoy kofi annan. out of principle, syria received the united nations supervision is seen
'm talking about the government. you may not want to go to gsa at this forest to veto this point because you can't get a counterfeit product if you go to each pay one of the non-trusted channels -- ebay one of the most non-trusted channels. on our infrastructure we are going to hope it is all assembled in a good way and there is no vulnerability interest that we tend to agree that all of these components. and now you are responsible. it's almost the end of the delivery part of whatever that trusted supplier was coming and now you are going to have to operate. operation requires that we actually follow best practices. and enforce information assurance policy. all of us want our 24/7 uptime of these things, so the 24/7 of time without having the security process in place also mean is available and accessible to anybody that might be able to penetrate that former ability. within the guidelines and other simple information assurance control help manage or reduce that risk of operation, and that's an essential handoff once we've delivered the product to market, and we are going to operate we shou
very strong views about governing and governance. and i don't early on that either side, governor schwarzenegger's has a monopoly on the best ideas. neither side has a monopoly on wisdom or so pricey and they can predict the future. so you start off with that mindset. i've been called for you as a moderate republican and i am just simply if you have a problem coming back to solve it. you don't run just to win. i mean, there's two parts to the equation. he went away many went together. as this in the last couple years we've lost the part of the equation. you run to win, run to win, run to win. what is the point of holding the office if you cat doing something with it? a couple observations that colleagues have made this is not just republicans or democrats. i suspect they ran against you. lindsey graham wasn't conservative enough, a good friend of mine told me a couple weeks ago that when i ran for governor, they thought it was too conservative to be governor of wisconsin. if the guy running for the senate and i don't think i'm conservative enough. even within the party were becomi
that to? >> i think we are at a fiscal and economic cliff. i think we have pursued government spending programs that have created a debt that is out of control. at the convention come after talking, i went home to my hotel at 1:30 a.m. and i was looking on my iphone at twitter. and the comedian paula pound stone had sent a tweet that evening. i don't know her, but she said " ted cruz just said that, when his daughter was born, the debt was $5 trillion and now it is $16 trillion. what the heck did she do?" [laughter] >> you think the debt is putting the nation in crisis. >> along with government spending, is causing the dead. we have seen a growing expansion in the power of the federal government. it is crippling small businesses. >> you are the national co-chair of the obama-bided campaign. >> i would put the challenge that we have as a nation in a different context. and say that, to the extent that we are a nation in "crisis," although i would not describe it as that because i believe that we can fundamentally overcome this and that we can do it in a fairly rational and reasonable way
of government and perhaps most important, all the think tanks, all those apparatuses sicko amount shaping how we think about the problems of the world, wickets in the media and newspaper. so that is how we'll normalize. the great fear of george lookout years ago called for shaping of common sense or what becomes the commonsense notion is that a neutral matter. it doesn't just flow out of the air. a lot of time and effort is spent by people who run the society to shape the common sense notion. and so i think we have a politics that has adjusted to our economic system as he should have expected it to do all along. those folks will not permit as much as they can, they are not going to permit the political system to undo the results of economic system with which they are quite pleased. as long as that happens, you, i am the american people in general going to confront a political system very nicely articulated to oscillate between two parties were differences, but whose differences are not about the basic economic system and neither has the slightest interest in debating that, let alone fundamentall
's there was the italians say that if you translate it is raining again. big of a government. that you rail and work against the state. and henry david thoreau basically had the etfs who went out on his essay of civil disobedience with the duties that surrounded him and said i want to look inside myself. i tried to do that increasingly everyday from alternate currencies with alternate myth did the exchange and to privatize to the extent possible. do not interact with the state. make sure you make going to businesses do not interact with the state we go through the unprecedented period of state control of our lives. you just have to say no. do not marty yourself. that would be reckless. to the extent possible privatize is your own personal life. >> host: do you live off the grid? you do not fly a on airplanes because of tsa? is that the type? >> i am here. i flew. [laughter] i cannot tell anyone what to do in their lives. budget to the extent it is paul assault -- possible. go private. do not use government. not to misrepresent the book because it is more theoretical and historical and the underpinnings brou
[inaudible] i hope one day we have the courage to elected government. look at what has happened in the region. you know, we spoke about the arab spring. it is a beautiful world, [inaudible] it is not romantic, the arab spring. the islamic forces are gaining power. nobody knows what will happen after bashar al-assad will get out of syria eventually. we have to be very careful. regarding the settlement, there is a gap between what people think about the settlement, i call it the jewish communities and reality. you can tell me, what is the actual percentage of settlement -- of jewish homes occupying land in [inaudible name]. building settlements -- jewish underground homes occupying the land? >> 3%. >> it is 3%. i wish it was 50 or 90 or 100%. that is not the case. most of it is vacant. the idea of the jews cannot believe this. i do not accept it. today in israel, we have all the israelis, 20%, where i live, though, like i ago, nobody can tell us if we do not live there, you have to move out. i think we need to get to the idea that it is not about the settlement, it is much deeper than that. [in
are not equal responsibility for our system. they at least take a stab at governing, even if results are mediocre at best. the republicans by contrast what confrontation never compromise, issues rather than build and gridlock over functioning government. their behavior caused standard & poor's to downgrade the nations credit rating last year and that caused me to write a book as a warning. this is enacted legislation 87 times doing the debt limit after world war ii, but last year it was different. republicans wanted to hold arbor day adtran credit rating hostage to the government accountability office found later that just the transaction cost for the gop's little stunned cost the taxpayers, due, at least $1.3 billion. my warning is that you cannot repeat, cannot delegate governance of the world's largest economic and military power to a cultlike political party that thinks up on the spur certificate, muslim subversion of the government and death panels are serious issues. of course by no means all republicans are like that, but increasing numbers are becoming unhinged. there are thr
of their government or the legislative branch can say that, you know, if we get such and such would it pass muster and we say yes or no and if the answer is no they go back and redo it and bring it back again and it works that way. our core to very early on established it wouldn't wish you advisory opinions that there had to be an actual case or controversy and adverse dealing between two or more parties before the court would take up the case and that is quite important in terms of how it developed in the relationship between the branches, the judicial review, the ability of the court to examine an act of congress and strike it down. we take for granted. the modern court has done that with and of course was asked to do it this spring in the health care case. john marshall famously declared that is what the power and the duty of the court to say what will law is and that was an expression of his understanding that the power of the judicial review is inherent in our constitutional system and that wasn't self-evident at all. so that is the power of jurisdiction, limits on jurisdiction that somebody
to come with the transition to democracy, i am convinced that ultimately government of the people, by the people, and for the people is more likely to bring about the stability, prosperity, and individual opportunity that serves as the basis for peace. >> next wednesday, october 3rd , but romney and president obama meet in their first presidential debate, moderated by jim lehrer of the news hour. watch and engage with c-span, including the live debate preview. the debate at nine, and after the date your reactions, calls coming e-mails command tweets. follow live coverage. .. on direct tv. c-span, created by american cable companies >>> a data among the candidates running to be the next governor. incumbent democrat jay nixon is seeking his second term running against dave spencer also libertarian jim higgs and it's raised as lean democratic. september 21st this comes to us from kmiz-tv. it's about an hour. >> governor nixon. go ahead. >> it's a pleasure to see so many friends we have worked with for so many years one of the reasons i ran for the governor and the things i've done fo
's cyberinfrastructure. government officials overseeing cybersecurity and the former acting senior director for cyberspace at the national security council were among the speakers at this to our event. >> ladies and gentlemen, if i could have your attention, please. my name is mike swetnam and it is my distinct honor and privilege to welcome here today for the seminar on the supply chain threats a cyber issue that we have been discussing in and around washington for quite some time to read the potomac institute, for those of you that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of cou
, our federal government imposes the worst in the world, 35% tax on job creating businesses in our country. the average is 25%. i advocate reducing it to 20% because i think america should be better than average. doing that will help create over 500,000 jobs a year. that's an inpent analysis. tim's view is one of increasing taxes. folks, lower taxes create jobs, greater opportunity, makes our country competitive, and it's amazing to me that tim, who would raise taxes on people buys used cars and folks earning as little as $17,000 a year will then will be put in jeopardy, the hundreds of thousands of defense and technology jobs, and in my view, the men and women in our armed forces should never be used as a political bargaining chip to raise taxes on job creating small businesses. >> when you eliminate deductions, would you do that for everyone or high income earners? >> first, i'll point out the last rhetoric about taking veterans hostage on economic issues. that's exactly the kind of name calling we've got too much of in washington. we can debate policies, but that's the name call
government, that washington seems to think is, um, you know, a good idea and ends up being counterproductive with a state like virginia that is growing, that has all the potential in the world but yet being held back because of its infrastructure shortcomings. so, yes, there's a lot we can do which is less and allow virginia to do more. >> moderator: mr. powell. powell: u.n., eric, you did not -- you know, eric, you did not support the stimulus the president initiated, however -- and, of course, i read so many things, i can't remember where i read it. i believe fredericksburg up to norb -- northern virginia. i may be wrong about that. >> you're wrong about that. >> well, let me finish. i let you finish, let me finish. in any case, you don't like government. you should just, like, resign, and i'll take over. [laughter] needless to say, government does have a role. i met people all over the district who, for example, in orange and culpepper counties, real people, human beings who couldn't get a connectivity for their cell phones, couldn't get their computer to work, couldn't call anybody. peop
flourish and do well and prevent the government from regulating of stifling job creation and continue to do that. privacy is a logical spacehab the data security will continue on we continue to look at bringing more minute factoring jobs back. >> mary bono mac, this is the communicators on c-span. we underestimate how much we forget of our own ideas. we are just terrible. it is an idea is this kind of homage this fleeting sense of something interesting and it kind of this appears so one of the things i found people doing and i try to do it as well as to write everything down but to keep everything together don't overorganize your notes and put them off into folders and things like that to allow the collisions to happen between your ideas but it's to go back the embrey read all those notes and go back and look at the notes from six years ago, and revisit that kind of self past and all of the ideas that he or she had. that is what place was like for the great land of the enlightenment. they would stitch together passages from the books they read it they would write their ow
groups held in the government controlled capital of damascus in an attempt at a gathering to position itself as an alternative to the armed rebels, citing the internal opposition on the syrian to cater. who are these people and what do you make of what they are saying? >> that's a good question. many fault lines in the syrian opposition. differences between the exiled syrian opposition a set of s-sierra, those fighting and dying on the ground in syria and those who are little more religious commission may come a arab opposition and those that are more secular opposition. and then you have those calling for the overthrow of the regime and those that are still blind to negotiate with the regime. there's been an attempt by outside powers, all these different groups of rebel forces to try to find a coherent center that can bring everything together in a coordinated way against the regime that would also draw outside support more readily as well as those fence sitters in the syrian population who don't necessarily support bashar al-assad regime, they don't see any viable alternative yet. o
during the school band challenges government authorities in the process of affecting standards to set equally strong standards for what kids can find in vending machines and what kids find in stores or the so-called cafeteria lines. bottom-line too much junk food available to kids in school and we as parents and citizens let alone military college, national secure in our country and interests must be doing something about it. my colleagues will offer their concerns and comments on our report. let me offer some simple facts to get us started. four hundred billion calories' of junk food sold in schools every year. fax number 2. if that was all candy bars laid end to end and would encircle the globe six times. one in four of children are ineligible to serve military services simply because they're too overweight. 25%. the next closest qualifier, asthma, at 4%. it is easy to link this obesity epidemic to impact on the national security of the country. we are trying to manage an all volunteer force of 25% of candidates from which we draw from people and ineligible to serve. fact number 5,
, to pave the way for a genetic change in the size and structure of the federal government. so i think yeah, you'll have linda lingle in hawaii who said she doesn't want to get rid of the affordable care act. that is going to become something. i think it is that a lot of progressives are hoping for. what it means however is that democrats might actually experienced losses while the progressive goal is proving durable might be achieved. >> great, fantastic discussion. let's turn it over to the audience here. read in the front row. >> hi, my name is tomball, owner illustrators magazine do with urban notch partners, a lot of shift. each acrobat deals with coverage. per the 2010 census and if you actually extrapolate the data to what their project and now, you're kind of looking not 38% to 62% as far as weight minorities to minority split non-hispanic white and then you add about 120 million minorities so is there any data you have that she was speaking about, even if it was 28%, you're still tracking 10% last than the actual population composition in america. so do you have data that shows how
provides response and defense against cyber attacks for the federal civilian part of the government, the dot.gov domains, last year it responded to more than 106,000 incident reports and released more than 5,000 cybersecurity alerts to our public and private partners. specialized dhs teams conducted 78 assessments of vulnerable industrial control systems, the possible gateway to a catastrophic attack. the word "cybersecurity" encompasses a broad range of malicious activity from denial of service attacks to the theft of intellectual process to intrusions against government networks and systems that control our critical infrastructure. last year, for example, a water plant for a small town in texas disconnected its control system from the internet after a hacker posted pictures of the facility's internal controls. more recently, cyber attackers penetrated the networks of companies that operate natural gas pipelines. and computer systems in critical sectors of the economy including the financial, nuclear and chemical industries are increasingly targeted. we also face a range of traditi
and the democrats. how they essentially tried to bring the federal government's financial house to some kind of order. the answer is they failed. we have a federal government whose financial house is in total disorder, total disarray. it is a historic problem. to try to put it in english, we have a trillion dollars of iou outstanding in the world. the negotiations, they agreed to raise what they call the debt ceiling, so the government can borrow a couple more trillion dollars. we are going to run it run out of that borrowing authority january or february of next year. they're going to have to go back and authorized congress for more trillions of dollars of borrowing. the republicans and lots of people in congress don't want to authorize that. so there is going to be a bloody negotiation, unless they can work a deal. in a sense, this is a book about the past, but it's about the present. it is about where we are going and what the country's future is. if you think about it i would argue that the inability of the government to fix this borrowing debt deficit issue in the book, vice president b
at the school level, government, generating data about education. how do you translate in to action? that's where we think it scrolled an important role. make sure that the data doesn't stay on the computer or the hard drive. get it to people so they can make decisions. that's one of the things we're trying to accomplish. are were a lot of other good points i would rather her about the panelists and the q & a i appreciate all the comments. >> one thing i wantedded to add too is the one most of the positive things about when i read your paper about what you're doing is for the practitioner, you are meeting an extremely important need. that is right now there are so many innovators and ideas out there they are everywhere. there's got to be a way to sort it. i think part of the concept is so important. it's like right now, in both places you go, people talk about the common core standards, and those are done. they have been adopted by 46 states. now is the implementation. it's a huge important step. what will we be doing differently in classrooms? almost every you see now is aligned with the
surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give sworn intelligence information. this is way of making sure that the court, there was a court that had to check and had a role in reviewing the government's effort to do this wiretapping which they ended up using in in
] i think that we shouldn't look at it in terms where the government begins and ends. i think that we are saddled with an insurance system in this country because of what happened after world war ii, an insurance system to provide health care. other countries don't have that to the extent we do, even countries that do allow it. so we have this insurance system, and what the government's, i think, reasonable job is, to make sure that the insurance system allows enough access, um, so that people can be covered within a reasonable premium amount. and that's done simply by watchdog and certain regulations. now, the truth is whenever you have the government involved, you have a question of whether they're doing it as cheaply as possible. but that's why we're still using the insurance system. because hopefully now insurance companies -- how many of you got refund check, by the way, from your insurance company, right? because all these years they've been overcharging for administrative costs. um, and so insurance companies now will regulate by what's a reasonable amount of money to charge a
of great ideas and we certainly don't want the government to come and destroy that. >> what were some of the problems that you saw in this area that he would like to address? >> one of the biggest problems is the work force. they are still looking for more people to move into this industry to develop that and work on creating the applications and all that goes into. that's the biggest problem that fewer people have that somehow in washington we are going to decide your way to tell liver but how to do their business or how not to do their business and hurt a growing business. the only real fear is the work force issue. the rest of it is nothing but optimism. they are recognizing so much growth in the industry that people are turning to the gaps. i used to get sable in the hearings for the moment that the other night i was babysitting my grandson and he started crying, and i did a good thing that any grandparent would do to revive that right to buy ipad and i tried to fight and application for the baby. >> were you successful? >> if i downloaded a app like a baby who isn't going to have
in the paper that the turkish government has agreed to give a billion dollars to the egyptian government. i thought it was an interesting twist in things. i think it's clear the egyptian feel maybe the american money isn't going come. maybe there isn't the money. that's going change the influence. in that part of the world engagement is the proof or the disprove of the the sis that is involved here. you scrolled a situation next year or the year after at some point where ron iran says we have a nuclear weapon. the united states hasn't gone in or taken military action to stop it. do you think it u would be fundamentally damage together united states perception of power and leadership in the world not being able to write checks is damaging the perception in the world we understand played. >> that was too hypothetical for me. seriously, there's so many steps in there. >> it's just one. >> the united states doesn't top iran from getting a nuclear weapon, does that san diego message that we are incapable of controlling outcomes in a way that some people think we might have in the past through mi
and they form a political party, there may be some deal done that gives them some positions in government in the run-up to the election as there is to perform political party community talk about amnesties. there would need to be cease-fires. all of that is asserted and you would to discuss any genuine political process. that hasn't started. >> to the extent to which we, we the whole of the international community has been participating, provided a substitute economy and afghanistan to start up allow me to develop so far. is that the incentive? is there some economic incentive that brings them into this process? is it that that's going to solve the problem is it's not constitutional matters in human rights and everything clicks >> we need to start reducing the amount of money these then on afghanistan. >> howell to be sustainable within itself? >> the economic process is one where we have to keep helping the afghans fun the development for 10 years beyond what they get on with developing the mineral resources. at the same time, trying to execute a political process to reduce the pressure
to appreciate how lax for married this birthday is that we celebrate. 225 years ago, august 1787 self-government is this almost nowhere in the planet outside of if. you have a few sheep and goat errors in some. holland is in the process of losing self-government. england has house of commons but also as a house of lords and a hereditary king. so you look back. the vast multitude of the planet , the self-government. the previous moments in -- millennium very few will city-state's. the flicker out. even with democracy, they speak the same language, worship the same guns. same climate and culture. very small areas. all of world history, very democracy. democracy, half the planet. i like our chances. ask me, what changed, the hands above that to london 25 years ago, the hands of world history. at the time it was way better, more perfect. for the first time ever in the history of the planet an entire continent got to go and have they in their posterity would be covered, and there were lots of exclusions, but we would not exist, you know, has a democratic country in the democratic world but for that.
. we had a government shut down. newt gingrich i clinton. once the government shut down, the pressure on both sides was so intense there was a deal in less than three weeks. the pressure, if we go into january, will be far greater than it was then because the economic consequences and the market consequences are more significant. i think it's inconceivable that if we go into january, there won't be a settlement in january, early february at the latest. we hit the debt ceiling in february anyway. there has to be a settlement. somebody has to blink, probably both sides blink to some degree. i've talked a little bit to people in financial markets in new york about how they think the markets would react to all of this. the reaction i've got is there's a lot of nervousness, a lot of volatility in the markets in january. if there is a deal in a few weeks, and any deal clearly makes retroactive to january 1st, the tax cuts continued, and we'll remove sequesteration, then what i'm told is in the interim the damage really won't be that significant. now, for fiscal hawks, many of us have been s
. many countries in the world have the registration modernization that means that the government register's people we and you don't have to turn in a paper form and it's not on the individual and because it is automatic more people registered and more people in the boating said it can be a good of increasing access or it can be bad in terms of manipulating rules. >> do you trust the electronic voting machines? >> i think there are certain safeguards we need to have in terms of electronic voting machines. we need audits and backup systems which more monitoring. the best analogy is las vegas. they have electronic machines in terms of the gaming machines and there are people who are on the inside who manipulate some of the machines, people who have been caught and imprisoned and as a result they have procedures to check the folks that were on these machines it isn't like a slot machine and it's important that we have checks come structural checks to ensure there is intent bearing or fraud or a problem. >> you use the word suppression the new politics of the voter suppression. how're they sup
. barack obama himself said that it would require us to report to the government, the women they have on the payroll, the men they have on the payroll, how much they paid those groups, and that is an attempt of the government to try to equalize pay between groups of women and groups of men. rather than, as well all holds right now, men and women in comparable jobs in the same jobs. so what they are trying to do is have people pay for equal work, not equal pay to equal work, which is very different things. there are no reasons why groups of women and men in the same firm should be paid to the same level if they have very different different jobs. you cannot get me to do will work. you have to pay people a lot of risk their lives during that kind of work. exxon mobil also has a group of women in communications systems, job publications -- there's no reason these two groups should necessarily be paid the same. but the paycheck fairness act would be moving toward requiring men and women be paid the same, even if they are in very different jobs. that is not paycheck fairness. that is commu
. there was a failed when -- it would require firms to report to the government the women they have on their payroll, the men they have on the payroll, how much they pay both groups, that's an attempt of the government to troy to equalize pay between groups of men and women. rather than as the law holds right now men and women in the come rabble job. they try to set equal pay for equal. which are two different things. there's no reason why groups of women and groups of men in the same firm should be paid the same if they have radically different jobs. look at exxon, for example, that has a group of men in oil drilling@s. it's a dirty dangerous job. you can't get me to codo that. you have to pay people a lot to risk their lives. they have a group of women in publications, communications, there's no reason the two groups should be necessarily paid the same. the paycheck would be moving toward requiring firms to pay men and women the same even if they're in different jobs. that is not paycheck fairness. that's communism. >> diana furchtgott-roth your book -- was there a time when women were treated unf
was a school cook. my father created his own business. hard work. government didn't help. but he had certain principles that he lived by, important principles. specifically, if you worked hard every day, if you worked hard every day, you'd get an opportunity to succeed. not a guarantee, but an opportunity. he also believed that if you played by the rules, you'd be rewarded, and if you didn't, there would be consequences. it's amazing how much in this country has changed in the last four years. and the result, the results of this change that what my father went through isn't true today, it's amazing what the impact has had on our government, our economy and on jobs. >> moderator: our first question comes from brent boynton. >> >> you both have a pretty consistent record of voting along party lines, and we've certainly seen more than our fair share of negative commercials during this campaign. many nevada cans and americans as a whole have grown tired of the youing polarity in between -- the growing polarity in between the political parties and ideologies. are you willing to compromise party i
for the governments in question in europe? it doesn't have to be basically settled by, say, later this month or october. >> when i was referring to measures rather than target, i was clearly focusing on fiscal consolidation. i was not referring to the debt sustainability analysis, nor the debt arising that we set when we design a program. and what we have, we have. 120% in 2020 is still clearly the horizon that is set, to measure the efforts that need to be undertaken by them. but on the fiscal front, clearly, you know, when we recommend that revenues be increased i ask by, for instance, by improving the tax collection, by entering into the privatization program in due course and should have happened and has not happened, when some cuts have to be made in programs that are probably some of the most expensive in the hold eurozone, that's what i mean by sticking to the measures, implementing but not necessarily sticking to the targets in terms of primary deficit number. >> okay, next. >> thank you, madam lagarde. and i am with china tv. my question is on the 2010 reform. you said it is now the
the programs that a constitutional program that government is responsible for and make them happy. so let me tell you how we have created this. by the way, just so you don't think that i am making all this up about how bad the political party system is, the first four presidents of the united states, those of you who study history, sometimes they didn't even like each other that much. but they all agree on one thing. what did washington, adams, jefferson, and madison all agree on? do not be political parties. they said did not create political parties. they had parties, obviously. some of you are historians. somebody is going to save they had political partisan, but they are nothing like the parties that we have now. they have political parties where they came together on three or four or five issues, and that was that. on other issues, i might agree with you one day, i would oppose you the next day, that is the way it was. but not anymore. when george w. bush was president and the president was issuing presidential signing statements, which i thought he was saying he did not have to obey th
a number of people living off the government. you know, my wife and i have given so much back to the st. louis city schools at roosevelt high school, for the past six years we've been knee-deep in the problem center city. and by the way, we 50,000 kids now with normandie going the other way and not accredited schools, 50,000. philip busch stadium standing room only. we need more people employed in the state. we need more opportunity, we need more dreams to be fulfilled and we are simply languishing at the bottom of the barrel almost every economic category. you know, a lot of education is leadership and it starts at the top. i think there's well-intentioned people. were starting to show signs of progress and it was. we been in there. we've been in the trenches. for six years we've been trying to find a solution to the problems. kansas city, we can help getting it going from the ideas we have. there is racial disparity that comes to economic opportunity and jobs. in the best gift we give somebody as a career. >> jim higgins. >> okay, well one of the most inefficient things you can do wit
to it that the real debate is about how we get it done and also the nature of the government that is the consequence of how gets them. obviously government will grow. if you shrink the budget the government will retract and that has implications to the budget. it's an ongoing debate always in america but if you think about what has been accomplished in the last year everyone knows we have to solve the problem. how to solve what has resulted in an impasse and, but the fact that everybody agrees it needs to be solved is really the most important thing. >> but it seems to me that it's a math problem and as you said, if you have got you know slow but stable growth for an extended period of time here than ultimately the raponos have to go up and expenditures have to go down. neither of which is particularly healthy in terms of economic growth. if you have taxes going up in the united states and expenditures going down ultimately that has to happen if you are going to solve that math problem in a slow growth while. >> at the same in europe and the same everywhere. we all grew up with spending more money.
networks for the poor in new mexico. i believe if the federal government would have block granted the state of new mexico 43% less money, done away with all the strings and the mandates that i could have effectively overseen the delivery of health care to the poor. i think you apply that same template to medicare, health care for those over 65, get the federal government out of the health care business completely, give it up to the states -- in this case block grants that balance revenu with expenditures -- and that's how we're going to get out of this. we're going to -- giving it up to the states, 50 laboratories of innovation and best practice, i think that's exactly what we will have. we'll have some fabulous success, we'll also have some horrible failure. failure will get avoided, success will get emulated. but that's how we're going to find our way out of this. >> host: gary johnson is joining us from new mexico this morning. he will be with us for about 40 more minutes. we'll put the phone numbers on the bottom of the screen as we take a look at the libertarian nominee and his positio
and so destructive to the status quo that the unholy alliance and corrupt government officials inspired to put them out of business in the same way as people who could not -- and conspired to put bill gates out of business. don't tie yourself that was it to good or. those guys were paid off and egged on by people in silicon valley such as bill gates. >> here's a little taste of donald luskin's, i am john galt, today's heroic innovators building the world and the villainous parasites destroying it. this is booktv. .. >> they operate danced is will not because of the lands it occupied but attacked because of the values and the values of democracy is getting to be interesting but we do follow it with those american values. sometimes too much. you'll find people putting the israeli flag with the american flag. i do not like it. why do people do it? because of democracy and value of the american people. even though we love america we are not america. if you make a mistake you pay a price that you are able to correct it. and we see in the past decisions you do not have to satisfy anyone to th
that is needed, in addition to contributions stability, financial safety nets, is our governance. and our governance clearly has evolved over time, and i've tried to keep up with the changing world. we have had reforms ever since 2006, and there is already been shifted towards emerging market economies, for instance, but there were a set of reforms that were decided in 2010, and to be accomplished by 2012. and we have made very significant progress towards delivering on that promise that was made by the membership. the first reform is the quarter reform. increasing significantly the quotas. for that we need to have a 70% vote. we are in excess of 70%. we have reached 73% and we are moving on. so on that front, quarter increase come we are there. but that reform can only be triggered if the conference reform is also voted. and there we have two triggers. one is i need to have 113 members signing on and saying yes, we want that reform. we are very close. i'm short a few countries. not many, and i hope that by tokyo we are there. and the second threshold is an 85% majority. that's a very hig
't want to be naive. it came from the people, western governments who were happy to see the people being democrats in egypt and supporting dictators themselves. what they did was egypt and so many dictators. they were supporting them because it suited the strategy. the point for me was to deal with this and be cautious with words. i was not buying from the beginning of this perception that the arabs spring, revolution. i started by saying let us be cautiously optimistic. something is happening which is great. this is what i call in the book and in the title the awakening. the awakening of the arab mind. the intellectual revolution with people understanding it is possible to get rid of dictators and change a country. this is fear reversible. and something which is a legacy of the personal a shift which is very promising for now and the future. to speak about revolutions that are achieved, i don't know. i don't know today if what is happening in egypt is an unfinished or achieved revolution. i don't know what is happening with what is happening in tunisia that we can be very quick in defin
, there are five or six changes in vietnam. we begin with a military government. it last a few months, and then a mixed civilian and military government. and then few months later, go back again to military. but anyway, the last government in the south before i become premier was civilian government. that mean the chief of state, mr. shue was the civilian. the prime minister was a civilian. but i think because they belong to two different political group. so they continued to fight each other as chief of state and as premier. so at the end, you know, how are we going to run the country with that kind of friction and fight? so one night they call up the armed forces council, which as commander of the air force, i am the member. so they call up on us to see them at the office of the prime minister. and they told us that they resign and handed the power back to the armed forces council. >> how many are on the armed forces council? how many generals? >> about 12, yes. but the armed forces council, few hundred. we include the young officers commanding division and battalion. but anyway, th
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